My Design Process – Part Three

Remember, I’m just sharing my process here – I’m not claiming to be an expert!

Think in multiples.

In addition to looking at an underlying grid, when I’m working with two blocks in a quilt, I’m thinking in multiples. Here’s a simple quilt I share on my website, designed in EQ7.

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Two easy blocks, a half square triangle and a double 4 patch.

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Once I decide that I want to use my 6 inch GO die for the half square triangle it’s easy to calculate that for the double four patch ( a 2×2 grid) my squares and 4 patches need to be 3 inches so for this quilt, I’d use my 6 inch half square triangle and 3 inch square ( finished sizes) and for my 4 patches, I’d use my 2 inch strip die so that each square in my 4 patch would finish at 1.5 inches.

1.5 plus 1.5 is equal to 3 and 3 plus 3 is equal to 6 – like I said it’s all about finding the multiples when combining different dies together or even determining what sizes to rotary cut blocks.

Of course, EQ will provide rotary cutting directions but I like to make it easy on myself and not have odd measurements so I always determine what I want my block size to be by looking at the underlying grid of the block and doing some simple multiplication first — then I plug that number into EQ.

I frequently see people questioning which dies they should buy for their GO and aside from dies like the Drunkard’s Path or the Dresden Plate which are block specific, this quilt is an good example of thinking about the combinations or multiples you’d use together.

2 thoughts on “My Design Process – Part Three

  1. Dianne King

    What a great, simple design, Mary. These musings of yours are really helpful to people starting to think about designing their own quilts, and it’s so great of you to take the time. It’s always a great reminder to those of us who’ve been quilting for a little while, too, to remember how wonderful a combination of simple blocks can look. Timeless, stylish, and oh so pleasing! Thanks for doing this!

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